High achieving School Habana

High achieving School Habana

In One Spirit…

We Welcome, we nurture, we excel

Holy Spirit College

Holy Spirit College is a co-educational Catholic High School in Mackay.

HSC seeks to nurture all types of learners through quality curriculum and supportive pastoral care, based on the life and values of Jesus.

Guided by our patron, the Holy Spirit, as a school we strive to achieve a sense of positive community for all, laying the foundation for a successful and fulfilling future for our students.

At Holy Spirit College, students enjoy the benefits of a complete secondary school environment – from Year 7 through to Year 12 – a structure which offers continuity, a plethora of opportunities and broad curriculum offerings.

Enrolment

Thank you for your interest in enrolling your child at Holy Spirit College. We welcome your Enrolment Application via our online enrolment process.

Newsletter

A weekly newsletter is distributed to student households each Thursday via email. To guarantee you receive the newsletter please notify the College Office of any email address changes.

Employment Opportunities

The College offers an innovative Curriculum, an exciting Year 10 Transition to Senior Program and a comprehensive range of Senior Courses catering for both academic and vocational pathways.

College Calendar

Find out all upcoming events, school holidays, exam blocks and more…

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Holy Spirit College is part of the Catholic Education family within the Diocese of Rockhampton. In the diocese, Catholic Education is responsible for three ministries – Adult Faith Education and Formation, Catholic Schools and Religious Education in State Schools. All who serve in these ministries strive to live the Catholic Education motto – ‘Meaning for Life’.

Google Reviews on the School

A truly amazing school, where you can join in Year 7 and go all the way through to Year 12. The staff really care about the students and want to help them achieve the best they can. Whether you child is academic or interested in sports or cultural pursuits, there is something for everyone.
They provide a top notch education and there are many extra curricular choices. The school is pristine and has the latest technology.
When I think of Holy Spirit College, I think of the following words:
quality, nurturing, welcoming, achieving, community.

Natasha M.

⭐⭐⭐⭐⭐


Holy Spirit College is an excellent school with a strong focus on studentship which aims to bring out the best in each student. Tremendous sporting, spiritual and cultural opportunities are offered at all levels to all students.

Communication with parents is second to none. This school expects, encourages and achieves outstanding academic results while also placing great value on personal growth and responsibility. Families are consulted and informed within the learning process.

Behavioural expectations are high, which allows dedicated teachers to deliver quality learning experiences which all students can access. Free tutoring is offered after school and the facilities are excellent.

Our four kids have all attended HSC and each has enjoyed and valued their school experience.

Allanah Z.

⭐⭐⭐⭐⭐


Amazing school just amazing I was a student here and the teachers and students are great I’m really sad that I left

Jamie W.

⭐⭐⭐⭐⭐


This school is beyond anyone's imagination, truly a perfect school to send your kids to. My son absolutely loves it there because of their cheap prices and high quality chocolate milk that only costs $2.50

Siron A.

⭐⭐⭐⭐⭐


A great school with pleasant teachers. No one judges you and everyone takes care of each other☺

Zoey G.

⭐⭐⭐⭐⭐


Heritage listings

Mackay has a number of heritage-listed sites, including:

  • Alfred Street: Mackay Technical College
  • Alfred Street: World War I Cenotaph
  • 251 Alfred Street: Mackay Central State School
  • Cemetery Road: Mackay General Cemetery
  • Cowleys Road: Selwyn House, Mackay
  • 38 East Gordon Street: East Gordon Street Sewerage Works
  • 39 Gordon Street: Holy Trinity Church
  • Habana Road: Richmond Mill Ruins
  • 21 MacAlister Street: St Pauls Uniting Church
  • 10 River Street: WH Paxton & Co buildings
  • 31 River Street: Mackay Customs House
  • 239 Nebo Road: Sugar Research Institute
  • 63 Sydney Street: Mackay Town Hall
  • Victoria Street: Mackay Court House and Police Station
  • 63 Victoria Street: Commonwealth Bank Building
  • 79 Victoria Street: Queensland National Bank
  • 1 Wood Street: Pioneer Shire Council Building
  • 57 Wood Street: Mackay Masonic Temple

Economy

As of the 2007–08, Mackay contributed $15.4 billion to the Australian economy, or 7.1% of Queensland’s gross state product (GSP). This is largely on the incite of its export-oriented industries of sugar and mining.

Mackay is well-known for its archives as one of Australia’s largest sugarcane farming regions. However, in recent years, the mining industry has become the mainstay of the local economy.[citation needed]

Mining

Mackay is widely recognised as the gateway to the Bowen Basin coal mining reserves of Central Queensland. It is the single largest coal unfriendliness in Australia, with 34 effective coal mines extracting higher than 100 million tonnes annually. While much of this is used in Australia, Japan and China are the largest export recipients.

Sugar

Mackay was known as the “sugar capital” of Australia, producing a sizeable allowance of Australia’s domestic supplies and exports. However, the industry experienced a subside in the 2000s.

The industry in Mackay has its roots urge on in the 19th century. Historically, plantations were little and had their own mills to destroy the cane during harvest. Over the years as the industry grew and developed, co-operatives were formed to consolidate the harvesting, crushing and distribution of the sugar in prearranged zones. Throughout the 20th century, the privately owned mills in the Mackay district closed one by one until single-handedly three remained – Marian, Racecourse Mill,
and Farleigh. Today, Pleystowe is the oldest steadfast mill in the district (but closed in 2008).

The Marian Sugar Cane Mill is situated in Marian, 25 km west of Mackay. At the Farleigh Mill, there are mill tours accessed via the internet. Racecourse Mill as a consequence does tours, and thus accessible via the internet. Mackay Sugar operates three of these enduring mills, including Racecourse, which became site of the region’s first sugar refinery (which is owned by CSR Limited) in the 1990s. Growers in the region have a sum cane production area of nearly 86,000 hectares. The growers are capable (in good seasons) of supplying up to 6.5 million tonnes of cane to the factories for processing. On average, Mackay Sugar produces roughly 850,000 tonnes of raw sugar and 180,000 tonnes of the by-product molasses annually.

The sugar industry in Mackay has faced steep challenges in the past 2000, since it is largely dependent upon high world sugar prices to remain viable. However, efforts are going into diversifying the use of sugar cane for substitute purposes. These count up a planned vivaciousness co-generation reforest that could attend to up to 30 per cent of Mackay’s annual electricity supply.

Tourism

Compared to many of its neighbouring cities and regions in Queensland, Mackay’s tourism industry is small and yet developing. This is despite being close to notable attractions including Eungella National Park, the Great Barrier Reef, and the Whitsunday Islands.

Latest figures indicate more or less 685,000 domestic and international visitors attain the region annually. More telling, however, is that domestic and international visitor night stays have increased to 2.7 million annually, an mass of nearly 1 million since 2000.

Several extra hotels have opened in the region back 2000, further indication of a growing industry. These adjoin The Clarion International, Quest Serviced Apartments and the Ibis Mackay Airport.

Marine

Like tourism, the marine industry in Mackay is little but has a lot of potential. Mackay is competently situated to become a major service middle for the marine industry, being in rushed proximity to the Whitsundays, and located halfway amid Brisbane and Cairns.

Currently the Mackay Marina is the largest base in the district for the maintenance, refit and joined services for all marine craft, particularly Super Yachts. The Mackay Whitsunday Super Yacht Cluster, a charity of regional companies focusing on providing integrated repair, refit and provisioning for the increasing number of visiting super yachts, was time-honored in 2001 to sustain and shout from the rooftops the loan of this sector.

Retail

Mackay has three main shopping centres. Caneland Central is the largest of these, with higher than 130 speciality stores. Myer is accompanied by the new anchor tenants. This go ahead was opened upon 13 October 2011.

Mount Pleasant Shopping Centre is the second major shopping centre in the Mackay region. It hosts department stores, supermarkets and further speciality outlets. Outside the main centre, a number of bulky-good outlets as well as operate, along in the freshen of a six-screen Birch Carroll and Coyle cinema complex.

The Mackay City Heart, located in the older city centre, is as well as another successful part of the city. It is the house of many of the region’s banks, law, accounting and extra professional facilitate firms.[citation needed]

Local attractions

Bluewater Trail

The Bluewater Trail project, managed by the Mackay Regional Council, covers greater than 20 kilometres (12 mi) of dedicated pedestrian paths and bikeways. The primary direct of the Bluewater trail is to give bolster to pedestrian and cyclist-friendly deeds that can be enjoyed anytime during the day or night. Now completed the track contacts several other attractions and tourism infrastructure pieces in this area the city including the Bluewater Lagoon, the Bluewater Quay and the Mackay Regional Botanic Gardens. It with incorporates the Sandfly Creek walkway through East Mackay, and the Catherine Freeman Walk which connects West Mackay to the city under the Ron Camm Bridge.

Located in the south of Mackay, the Mackay Regional Botanic Gardens are the Begin of the Bluewater Trail. The gardens opened and replaced Queen’s Park as Mackay’s botanic gardens in 2003 containing an array of scarce plants original to the Mackay area and Central Queensland. Before 2003, the area was commonly called The Lagoons, and is centred on the shores of a billabong that years ago formed ration of the Pioneer River extra to the north.[citation needed]

Heading east taking into account the Mackay Base Hospital and along the Catherine Freeman Walk, the Bluewater Lagoon emerges. Comprising three tiered lagoons, the lagoon is a release family-friendly leisure talent overlooking the Pioneer River in the heart of Mackay’s city centre. A waterfall connects the two main lagoon areas, which revise in intensity up to 1.8 metres (5 ft 11 in). Similar to the Famous Streets Beach at the South Bank Parklands in Brisbane, the lagoon is a popular summertime fellow feeling for locals and visitors.

Further east along the trail is Bluewater Quay. As share of Queensland’s 150th anniversary celebrations, $12 million has been invested into the transformation of River Street, to the sudden east of the Forgan Bridge. The street now has various public amenities including permission to a new viewing platform, upgraded fishing jetty, stage areas, cafes and space for weekend markets. Being 250 metres (820 ft) long, the quay is built re the historic Leichhardt Tree (which falls below the Nauclea evergreen variety), a common meeting lessening for additional migrants to Mackay who arrived at the old Port district along River Street.

The Bluewater Trail project has been very successful, gained significant reply and usual several awards:

  • In 2010, it standard national recognition, collecting two awards at the National Heart Foundation Local Government Awards. The Bluewater Trail was named the National overall winner and won its category (Planning for Active Living) at the Heart Foundation Local Government Awards.
  • In 2010 and 2011, the trail was recognised in the Community Champions Award by the Queensland Spinal Injuries Association (QSIA). It was awarded for providing equitable and accessible services in the category of Best Recreation/Leisure Venue or Precinct.
  • The Bluewater Trail has furthermore gained considerable combination from extra organisations and programs and has been used as an ‘inspirational example’ as portion of the afterward two case studies in 2011:
  1. ‘Active Healthy Communities’ – a resource package for local presidency to create supportive environments for physical argument and healthy eating coordinated by Queensland Government (Queensland Health) in partnership in the same way as the Heart Foundation and Local Government Association of Queensland Ltd (LGAQ).
  2. ‘Healthy Community / Healthy Workplace projects or initiatives’ – case studies aiming to construct the power of Queensland councils by raising preparedness of the relevance, role and opportunities for creating healthy communities coordinated by Local Government Association of Queensland Ltd (LGAQ).
  • In 2012 Mackay Regional Council Manager Recreation Services Mr Onno Van Es won the 2012 Local Government Association Queensland (LGAQ) Healthy Leaders Award (Senior Manager Category). “Onno was the visionary and leader astern two award winning council projects, the Bluewater Lagoon and the Bluewater Trail, that find the grant for residents the inadvertent to gain outdoors and bring to life a healthy lifestyle.” He was recognised for “nurturing healthy partnerships across giving out jurisdictions and securing significant resources for healthy community infrastructure, shaping the atmosphere through the introduction of the great compliment winning $30 million Bluewater Trail and $12.7 million Bluewater Lagoon projects and their activation through the delivery of healthy lifestyle programs.”

Festival of Arts

The Mackay region is home to the Mackay Festival of Arts held annually throughout July. Now higher than 20 years old, it is the largest regional arts festival in Queensland. The festival features wine and cheese tasting sessions, live jazz and further music, stand-up routines, art exhibitions, dance and supplementary performances.

City Centre

The City Centre is noted for its art-deco inspired architecture, with many buildings throughout the main streets of the central business district featuring distinctive designs from the into the future 20th century. Some of the most famous buildings are the former Main Post Office dating from 1940 taking into account its clock tower, the Masonic Temple built in 1936, the Pioneer Shia Council built in 1935, Taylors Hotel (1936) and the Ambassador Hotel (1937). The Commonwealth Bank which was built as upfront as 1880 and the Old Court home dating from 1885 are two of the oldest buildings in town. The Technical College which was built 1911-12 is a share of the University. One of the most well-known houses built in an art-deco style is Chaseley House in Sydney Street. The Town Hall dating from 1916 is one of the buildings which survived the cyclone of 1918 undamaged. St. Paul’s Uniting Church which was completed in 1898 is the oldest church in town. One of the largest churches is St. Patrick Church whose parsonage built in 1915 is one of the oldest residential buildings in Mackay.
The precinct was upgraded in the 1990s through a unique community arts project. The overall theme depicts the environmental beauty of the Mackay region and consists of bronzed plaques, sculptures and terrazzo/mosaic tiles. Of particular amalgamation is a sculptured free-form seat in the impinge on of a bommie, or bombora, and covered in myriad colours depicting the Great Barrier Reef through to the rainforests of Eungella National Park. Many boutique stores, restaurants, bars and nightclubs are customary throughout the precinct.

Mackay Marina Village

Mackay Marina Village is a coastal precinct located neighboring the Mackay Harbour. The quay itself has nearly 500 berths. It is also home to a sizeable residential village of luxury apartments, in accessory to the Clarion Mackay Marina luxury hotel.

Gateway to the Pioneer Valley

The scenic Pioneer Valley spreads out to the west of Mackay, with the Pioneer River meandering through it 120 kilometres (75 mi) to the mouth at the harbor of Mackay. Nearly anything of the sugar cane grown in the Mackay region comes from the Pioneer Valley, and it is synonymous bearing in mind the wealthy soils and irrigation[citation needed] with which the sugar industry in Mackay has thrived over the similar to century.

Among the natural assets of the Pioneer Valley are the walking tracks and swimming holes of Finch Hatton Gorge. The Eungella National Park, located at the very summit of the range, is the longest and oldest stretch of subtropical rainforest in Australia, covering beyond 51,700 hectares. It is one of the few places where platypus can be seen swimming in the wild, while higher than 225 species of bird have been recorded in the surrounding forests.

Islands and beaches

Mackay has 31 beaches within driving distance. Closest to the city are Illawong, Far and Town beaches. The patrolled Harbour Beach, adjacent to the Mackay Marina, is the most popular, being tolerable for swimming. Lambert’s Beach is also near to the city. Further north of the city are popular beaches at Bucasia, Dolphin Heads, Blacks Beach, Shoal Point and Eimeo – collectively these areas are known as the Northern Beaches. The Northern Beaches are popular next visitors, but are increasingly living thing developed as residential areas for Mackay’s growing population.

The islands gruffly off Mackay are Famous for their azure blue waters, and are popular considering fishermen. St Bees Island in particular is a well- known fishing spot. Brampton Island, to the north-east of the city, is a resort destination, with body therapy, water sports and snorkelling on offer. Flights to Brampton are simple from Mackay Airport, as are boats from the marina. Carlisle, Scawfell and Keswick are further notable islands. Each is a national park together with coral reefs. During the pinnacle season from June to the grow less of August, whales can be heard and seen around these islands.

River Sessions Festival

Held annually in June, River Sessions is Mackay and Central Queensland’s premier teens and contemporary music festival. The festival features the best rock, hip-hop, alternative, folk, pop and dance music acts from nearly Australia.

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